a
Welcome to EWTN GB - Global Catholic Television Network - Copyright © 2020
HomeCatechism & ApologeticsCan you name an Eucharistic miracle?

Can you name an Eucharistic miracle?

Can you name an Eucharistic miracle?

Shalone Cason via Unsplash

 

John 6:53-57

53 Jesus said to them, ‘Very truly I tell you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. 54 Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise them up at the last day. 55 For my flesh is real food and my blood is real drink. 56 Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood remains in me, and I in them. 57 Just as the living Father sent me and I live because of the Father, so the one who feeds on me will live because of me. 

 

Catechism of the Catholic Church

1376 – The Council of Trent summarizes the Catholic faith by declaring: “Because Christ our Redeemer said that it was truly his body that he was offering under the species of bread, it has always been the conviction of the Church of God, and this holy Council now declares again, that by the consecration of the bread and wine there takes place a change of the whole substance of the bread into the substance of the body of Christ our Lord and of the whole substance of the wine into the substance of his blood. This change the holy Catholic Church has fittingly and properly called transubstantiation.”206

206 – Council of Trent (1551): DS 1642; cf. Mt 26:26 ff.; Mk 14:22 ff.; Lk 22:19 ff.; 1 Cor 11:24 ff.

 

1) Miracle of Lanciano – 8th century

Public Domain / Wikipedia
Public Domain / Wikipedia

In the 8th century, a priest in Lanciano, Italy was experiencing doubts about the real presence of Jesus in the Eucharist. In the middle of saying Mass, he said the words of consecration (“This is my body,” “This is my blood) and saw the bread and wine transform into real human flesh and blood. The blood coagulated into five globules (later believed to be representative of the five wounds of Christ). Word of the miracle quickly spread, the local archbishop launched an investigation, and the Church approved the miracle.

The flesh is still preserved to this day. Professor of anatomy Odoardo Linoli conducted a scientific analysis of the flesh in 1971 and concluded that the flesh was cardiac tissue, the blood appeared to be fresh blood (as opposed to blood that was 1200 years old), and there was no trace of preservatives.

You can visit the miraculous flesh and blood in the Church of San Francesco in Lanciano, Italy.

Public Domain / Wikipedia
Public Domain / Wikipedia

 

2) The Corporal of Bolsena – 13th century

Paolo C. / Flickr
Paolo C. / Flickr

A priest who had been experiencing doubts about transubstantiation was celebrating mass in Orvieto, Italy. Soon after he had consecrated the Eucharist, the host started bleeding onto the corporal (a liturgical cloth) on the altar. The priest, the story goes, ran to the pope who was visiting the town and confessed his sin of doubt. The corporal remains on display in the Cathedral of Orvieto.

Some historians, however, question the veracity of the story, since the first accounts of it don’t appear until about a hundred years after the miracle supposedly took place. Nonetheless, the corporal remains an object of veneration.

Steve Moses / Flickr
Steve Moses / Flickr

 

3) The Hosts of Siena, Italy – 18th century

via meconferencesc.net
via meconferencesc.net

On August 14th, 1730, while the Catholics of Siena, Italy were attending a special festival for the eve of the feast of the Assumption, thieves entered the Church of St. Francis and stole a golden ciborium containing hundreds of a consecrated hosts.

Two days later, someone noticed something white protruding from the offering box at another church in Siena. The priests opened the box and found the missing hosts inside, entangled in cobwebs and dirt. After being cleaned as much as possible, the hosts were placed in a new ciborium and taken back to the Church of St. Francis for prayers of reparation and veneration.

Since the hosts were dirty, the priests decided not to consume them but let them simply deteriorate. Over the next few decades, everyone was amazed to see that the hosts did not deteriorate, but actually appeared fresh.

The hosts remain in this state today, 285 years later, and can still be seen in the (now) Basilica of St. Francis in Siena, Italy.

 

4) The Miracle of Chirattakonam, India – 21st century

via guadalupehousehi.blogspot.com
via guadalupehousehi.blogspot.com

On April 28th, 2001, there was Eucharistic adoration at St. Mary’s parish in Chirattakonam, India, when suddenly three red stains materialized on the host. The priest didn’t know what to do and placed the host back into the tabernacle.

A few days later he retrieved the host to examine it again, and the red stains had arranged themselves to look like the face of a man (Jesus?). He quickly found a photographer and had pictures taken of the host.

 

5) The Eucharistic Miracle of Santarém – 13th century

via miraclesofthechurch.com
via miraclesofthechurch.com

A woman living in Santarém, Portugal in the 13th was distressed that her husband was unfaithful to her, and she decided to consult a sorceress for help. The sorceress told her the price of her services was a consecrated host.

She went to Mass at the Church of St. Stephen and received the Eucharist on her tongue, removed the Eucharist from her mouth, wrapped it in her veil, and headed to the door of the church. But before she got out, the host began to bleed.

When she got home, she put the bloodied host in a trunk. That night, a miraculous light emanated from the trunk. She repented of what she had done and the next morning confessed to her priest. Her priest came and retrieved the host and took it back to the church.

After an investigation and approval of the miracle, the church was renamed Church of the Holy Miracle, and the bloodied host remains on display to this day.

via houseofbrigid.org
via houseofbrigid.org

 

6) A comprehensive list of Eucharistic miracles (please click the link below)

Eucharistic Miracles – Website by Blessed Carlo Acutis

 

From ChurchPop

Share With: